how to make a resume

How To Make A Resume


STEP-BY-STEP RÉSUMÉ BREAKDOWN
1. Decide Which Type Of Résumé You Want.

There are three types of résumés: chronological, functional and combination. You might want to consider more than one format of résumé if you're applying for multiple jobs.

Chronological is the most traditional format and lists experiences according to the order in which they took place. These résumés generally appeal to older readers and may be best suited for a conservative field.

Functional is a type of résumé that lists your experiences according to skill. This is the format to use if you're changing career direction (and lack direct work experience). Because it displays your skills first, your work experience, or lack thereof, is not the main focus.

Combines the best aspects of the chronological and functional styles. Be careful with length for this format; the résumé can quickly get long.


2. Create A Header.

A header should include your name, phone number and email address. You can also include your mailing address, but leave it out if you plan to post your résumé online.


3. Write A Summary.

In one or two sentences, summarize your work experience and relevant skills. Keep this strong and simple.


4. List Your Experiences Or Skills.

FOR CHRONOLOGICAL/COMBINATION RÉSUMÉS, LIST YOUR EXPERIENCES

Starting with your most recent or current job, list your previous work experiences.


5. List Your Activities.

List activities in which you have participated and include what your specific role was in each.

This is the place to note membership or leadership positions in clubs, organizations of any kind, athletic teams, community organizations and so on.


6. List Your Education.

List the schools you've attended, starting with the most recent one. Include details such as GPA, class rank or special awards.

Add any other educational experiences, such as training programs, community college or summer courses, seminars and so on.

Examples:


7. List Any Awards You've Won And When You Won Them.

When you've been recognized by someone else, you should let potential employers know about it. But you shouldn't worry if you haven't received any awards; just skip this section.


8. List Your Personal Interests.

This section shows you're a well-rounded person who people would want to know and work with.

Employers often use this section at the start of an interview to break the ice.

Casual interests are better not to list (e.g., napping, watching reality TV, gossiping). This is really about highlighting hobbies that have helped you grow as a person.


SUBMITTING YOUR RÉSUMÉ

When it comes to applying for a job, there are several ways you can share your résumé with an employer. Make sure you're aware of these dos and don'ts to ensure your hard work is represented clearly.


Saving Your Résumé As A PDF

Most employers prefer to receive résumés in the Portable Document Format (PDF). To create yours, look for the "Save as PDF" or "Print to PDF" option in your word processor. Review the file carefully to make sure your formatting is preserved.